You get a little older and strange thoughts enter your head. Like, “I wonder why I’m standing here at the fridge.” Or, “Why can’t I remember the name of what’s his name?” You also think about your last words. I think I’ll gather my kids close and whisper, “I left a million dollars in the…”

What will you say? “Beam me up, Scotty”?

Comedian Bob Hope died at the ripe old age of 100. When his wife asked him where he wanted to be buried, Bob Hope quipped, “Surprise me.”

Dominique Bouhours was a grammar expert. He said with his dying breath, “I am about to – or I am going to – die. Either expression is correct.”

Another passionate grammarian was Thomas de Mahy. When condemned to the guillotine, he read his death warrant and remarked, “I see that you have made three spelling mistakes.”

Right before his execution by lethal injections, Christopher Emmett said, “Tell the governor he just lost my vote.”

General John Sedgwick was a military officer during the American civil war. Some of his last recorded words were, “They couldn’t hit an elephant at this distance.”

Looking for loopholes When asked why he was reading the Bible on his deathbed, comedian W.C. Fields said, “I’m looking for loopholes.”

He wouldn’t have to look far. There is a divine loophole. Before His death, some of Jesus’ last words were, “It is finished.” He accomplished what He came to do. The perfect Son of God offered Himself as a final sacrifice, once for all. He died, broke the power of sin, rose from the grave, and defeated death. Because He lives, death lost its sting. Through the centuries, doubters have been in awe of how Christians die. At the end, Richard Baxter, the English martyr said, “I have pain; but I have peace, I have peace!”

D.L. Moody, the American evangelist, awoke from sleep shortly before he died and said, “Earth recedes. Heaven opens before me. If this is death, it is sweet! There is no valley here. God is calling me, and I must go.” Moody’s son said, “No, no, father. You’re dreaming.” Moody replied, “I am not dreaming. I have been within the gates. This is my triumph; this is my coronation day! It is glorious!”

Suppose this day was our last day. Would we do what we’re doing? Or would we encourage more, forgive more, and love more? If so, let’s do it. Let’s encourage and give and forgive and love like there’s no tomorrow, and should tomorrow arrive, let’s start over and do it again.

Perhaps on my death bed I’ll have my kids lean close and I’ll whisper, “Listen up. This is the last time I’m gonna say this…”